Creekside

No better time than now


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Monarch butterfly feeding on lantana

January 19, 2019

Northern California

Teetering on endangerment, this Monarch fed in this purple lanatana for 20 minutes, maybe longer. The flower is more purpose than pink in real life.

We used to see several per year. But it’s rare now. Counters report that Monarchs are down 86% from last year. Last year.

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Patti Smith, The Fillmore, 1/12/2019

People have the power

I did not get a great photo, but the concert was fantastic.

The historic Fillmore has no seating in the auditorium. Just wooden floor. Perfect for PS as this is performance art with audience participation encouraged.

Photo shows that there are Opera boxes on the second level. Never been there.

Both PS and long-time (’73) band mate, Lenny Kaye are 72. She brought down the house.

Set list: https://www.setlist.fm/setlist/patti-smith/2019/the-fillmore-san-francisco-ca-5b9477ac.html


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SciFi Mushrooms

When I first saw this architecture at the base of this gaura I thought, what on earth?

Mushrooms.

On my street there are huge camphor trees. Many are dying because they have a deadly fungus. Where the trees have been taken out, when there is a lot of rain, mushrooms grow abundantly, apparently from the remaining, infested roots.


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Lone Egret

Egrets are solitary creatures. They are fairly common along the bank of Stevens Creek and in the shallow bay waters at Shoreline at Mountain View. They are sensitive and will take off if they sense a sound or movement nearby.

This Egret was watching the creek. I had taken a few photos of the new Google campus, under obstruction. Then I watched this Egret and took a few shots with my iPhone 7. In the creek, you can see the refection of the massive cranes at the Google site.

I started to put my phone in my pocket when the Egret raised its wings and sailed up. I had not made any noise or sudden movement. Torn between watching and taking a photo I quickly raised my iPhone and got the shot of the Egret in flight then snapped a few more as it landed.

As soon as it landed on the opposite bank, water rushed out of the runoff pipe beside its previous perch. Now I could see that it had heard the water heading down the pipe, which I could not. That’s what made it take off.

Not until I looked at the photos in my iPhone did I see that the photo of the Egret in flight, with the full wing spread, the white against the near black, and with the refection in the creek was such a magestic image.